Grant Chu Covell

Managing Editor Grant Chu Covell works in the Boston area for a global technology company that made hardware which Xenakis and Babbitt used to good effect. His music reviews have appeared in EAR Magazine and InMusic, and he was the publisher of The Periodic Journal of Bibliography (1990-95). A short article on a work for piano and tape is in the Csound Magazine. His instrumental and electroacoustic music has been performed in the U.S. and abroad, and he has shared too many CDs of his music with family and friends (one work was recorded in a refrigerator). Two electroacoustic works have appeared in commercial compilations: Presence III and The Door Project. A recent CD can be found here. A long departed family dog’s name was taken from a character in Wagner’s Ring.

Mostly Symphonies 30.

In 16 intentionally disjointed tracks, with internal repetitions and drop-kicked transitions, Play.list unspools like a pocket Strauss tone poem tracked randomly.

Mostly Symphonies 30.

In 16 intentionally disjointed tracks, with internal repetitions and drop-kicked transitions, Play.list unspools like a pocket Strauss tone poem tracked randomly.

Mostly Symphonies 29: Keep Going, Keep Going… Two new Berio Sinfonias

Berio the finisher and arranger was asked to orchestrate several Mahler songs from Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Knowing Sinfonia lurks around the corner, these songs take on an innocent, even archaic quality when we know the postmodern age is just moments away.

Mostly Symphonies 29: Keep Going, Keep Going… Two new Berio Sinfonias

Berio the finisher and arranger was asked to orchestrate several Mahler songs from Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Knowing Sinfonia lurks around the corner, these songs take on an innocent, even archaic quality when we know the postmodern age is just moments away.

Mostly Symphonies 28: Untangling Schnittke

For a full 48 minutes, there’s nothing ambiguous here, nothing that suggests its composer could command many styles and would with apparent frivolity combine them in the same work.

Mostly Symphonies 28: Untangling Schnittke

For a full 48 minutes, there’s nothing ambiguous here, nothing that suggests its composer could command many styles and would with apparent frivolity combine them in the same work.

String Theory 21: Mostly Viola(s)

Royer is an inspired Scelsi performer. He plays as if improvising, easing into Scelsi’s languid microtones with grace notes flicked away like involuntary twitches.

String Theory 21: Mostly Viola(s)

Royer is an inspired Scelsi performer. He plays as if improvising, easing into Scelsi’s languid microtones with grace notes flicked away like involuntary twitches.

Piano Factory 17.

Craven provides only pitches and permits repetitions, octave displacement, variable dynamics, etc.

Piano Factory 17.

Craven provides only pitches and permits repetitions, octave displacement, variable dynamics, etc.

String Theory 20: Mostly Violin (with Piano Accompaniment)

With coarse harmonies and a rhythmic engine requiring a few cranks before it hums, the two-movement Sonata emerges brooding and severe, wonderfully modern and unfamiliar.

String Theory 20: Mostly Violin (with Piano Accompaniment)

With coarse harmonies and a rhythmic engine requiring a few cranks before it hums, the two-movement Sonata emerges brooding and severe, wonderfully modern and unfamiliar.

String Theory 19: Mostly Cello

Pieces requiring retuning or scordatura have a modest foothold in the literature. It is very unusual to encounter works where strings are adjusted while playing, but several specimens fill out Ballon’s bold recital.

String Theory 19: Mostly Cello

Pieces requiring retuning or scordatura have a modest foothold in the literature. It is very unusual to encounter works where strings are adjusted while playing, but several specimens fill out Ballon’s bold recital.

Piano Factory 16. / (Dis)Arrangements 9: Liszt and Wagner

Liszt’s last pieces reflect little interest in pyrotechnics or showy glamour. They are curious about harmony and the spiritual world; some touch on historical subjects, but most all are reflective, even world-weary.

Piano Factory 16. / (Dis)Arrangements 9: Liszt and Wagner

Liszt’s last pieces reflect little interest in pyrotechnics or showy glamour. They are curious about harmony and the spiritual world; some touch on historical subjects, but most all are reflective, even world-weary.

(Dis)Arrangements 8: More Schubert

Schubert left no concertos, but we do have Liszt’s overstuffed quasi-symphonic Fantasy for piano and orchestra.

(Dis)Arrangements 8: More Schubert

Schubert left no concertos, but we do have Liszt’s overstuffed quasi-symphonic Fantasy for piano and orchestra.

Italian Vacation 14.

To say Aldo Clementi uses canons, is like saying Wagner wrote operas or that Beethoven was good at variations.

Italian Vacation 14.

To say Aldo Clementi uses canons, is like saying Wagner wrote operas or that Beethoven was good at variations.