(Dis)Arrangements

Piano Factory 16. / (Dis)Arrangements 9: Liszt and Wagner

Liszt’s last pieces reflect little interest in pyrotechnics or showy glamour. They are curious about harmony and the spiritual world; some touch on historical subjects, but most all are reflective, even world-weary.

Piano Factory 16. / (Dis)Arrangements 9: Liszt and Wagner

Liszt’s last pieces reflect little interest in pyrotechnics or showy glamour. They are curious about harmony and the spiritual world; some touch on historical subjects, but most all are reflective, even world-weary.

(Dis)Arrangements 8: More Schubert

Schubert left no concertos, but we do have Liszt’s overstuffed quasi-symphonic Fantasy for piano and orchestra.

(Dis)Arrangements 8: More Schubert

Schubert left no concertos, but we do have Liszt’s overstuffed quasi-symphonic Fantasy for piano and orchestra.

(Dis)Arrangements 7: Beethoven

This Ninth is fascinating, hugely musical, a testament to Beethoven and Liszt’s combined brilliance.

(Dis)Arrangements 7: Beethoven

This Ninth is fascinating, hugely musical, a testament to Beethoven and Liszt’s combined brilliance.

(Dis)Arrangements 6. / Piano Factory 14.

Bach and Scarlatti on piano are intrinsically arrangements, music relocated to an instrument unanticipated by their composers. Some 19th and 20th-century composer-pianists found Bach and Scarlatti too spindly for the ivories. They added notes and fleshed out chords, and took other liberties such as composing new voices or adjusting harmonies.

(Dis)Arrangements 6. / Piano Factory 14.

Bach and Scarlatti on piano are intrinsically arrangements, music relocated to an instrument unanticipated by their composers. Some 19th and 20th-century composer-pianists found Bach and Scarlatti too spindly for the ivories. They added notes and fleshed out chords, and took other liberties such as composing new voices or adjusting harmonies.

(Dis)Arrangements 5.

In a mood to recycle, Sciarrino generally prefers to rummage through his own material. However, this disc presents a few pieces which adapt and twist others.

(Dis)Arrangements 5.

In a mood to recycle, Sciarrino generally prefers to rummage through his own material. However, this disc presents a few pieces which adapt and twist others.

(Dis)Arrangements 4: Mozart and Tchaikovsky

Mozart’s arrangements take slight liberties: His sources strayed from Bach’s original, not because Mozart thought to make improvements.

(Dis)Arrangements 4: Mozart and Tchaikovsky

Mozart’s arrangements take slight liberties: His sources strayed from Bach’s original, not because Mozart thought to make improvements.

(Dis)Arrangements 3:
Shostakovich Preludes

To accompany their Brandenburg Concerto release, Ensemble Caprice’s director arranged six preludes and one fugue from Op. 87 in complementary instrumentation. It doesn’t sound like Shostakovich – more like polytonal Rameau.

(Dis)Arrangements 3:
Shostakovich Preludes

To accompany their Brandenburg Concerto release, Ensemble Caprice’s director arranged six preludes and one fugue from Op. 87 in complementary instrumentation. It doesn’t sound like Shostakovich – more like polytonal Rameau.

(Dis)Arrangements 2: Goldberg Fever

A recent check disclosed 228 available recordings of Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Most are for a single keyboard as intended, but there are also arrangements and transcriptions. Here’s a random scattering of BWV 988 arrangements and digressions.

(Dis)Arrangements 2: Goldberg Fever

A recent check disclosed 228 available recordings of Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Most are for a single keyboard as intended, but there are also arrangements and transcriptions. Here’s a random scattering of BWV 988 arrangements and digressions.

(Dis)Arrangements

The Four Seasons has been deftly mutilated… Richter never forgets that harmony lies at Vivaldi’s core, regardless of repetition or the solo line. I imagine that Hope must hereafter worry he might confuse one for the other in performance.

(Dis)Arrangements

The Four Seasons has been deftly mutilated… Richter never forgets that harmony lies at Vivaldi’s core, regardless of repetition or the solo line. I imagine that Hope must hereafter worry he might confuse one for the other in performance.

Piano Factory 8. (D. 840)

In 1825 Schubert abandoned a C major piano sonata. After Schubert died in 1828 his brother Ferdinand gave the manuscript to Schumann who then passed it to first publisher K.F. Whistling. Whistling presumed the sonata was left incomplete because of the composer’s death and erroneously gave it the nickname “Reliquie” (Relic).

Piano Factory 8. (D. 840)

In 1825 Schubert abandoned a C major piano sonata. After Schubert died in 1828 his brother Ferdinand gave the manuscript to Schumann who then passed it to first publisher K.F. Whistling. Whistling presumed the sonata was left incomplete because of the composer’s death and erroneously gave it the nickname “Reliquie” (Relic).