Dan Albertson

Dan Albertson, (“he”), born betwixt a quarter and a third of a century ago and once from small-town Michigan yet now settled further to the Midwest, is biographically reticent, a man of few passions and perhaps, per Musil, a man lacking in qualities. No training in any particular field, but seems closest to belonging in the realm of musicology. He both delights in, and is dismayed at, his lack of institutional affiliation. He is the founder and director of the Living Composers Project, though his own interest has turned decidedly against contemporary music in recent years and towards the Baroque and Renaissance. Thank you, Sir Roger. Contemporary music is too often “garbage,” he believes, though with obvious exceptions. He is the author of critical articles for American and European publications and has edited four volumes of Contemporary Music Review, on composers Helmut Lachenmann, Earle Brown and Aldo Clementi. As a poet, he has collaborated with several composers but tends to write poems as gifts — sometimes welcomed. As translator, he works regularly with Cybele Records in Düsseldorf. He enjoys walks, jogs, swims and paintings, but not all at once.

Boulez: A Master Speaks Anew

There may be no post-World War II work for voice and instrumentalists more famous than Pierre Boulez’s 1950s song cycle Le marteau sans maître.

Boulez: A Master Speaks Anew

There may be no post-World War II work for voice and instrumentalists more famous than Pierre Boulez’s 1950s song cycle Le marteau sans maître.

Gubaidulina: Recent Works

An orchestral piece by Gubaidulina comes with expectations: prominent metallic percussion, bustling strings, violent tutti climaxes, etc.

Gubaidulina: Recent Works

An orchestral piece by Gubaidulina comes with expectations: prominent metallic percussion, bustling strings, violent tutti climaxes, etc.

Luigi Dallapiccola: For Orchestra

Were one limited to a single term for Luigi Dallapiccola’s music, I would choose enchanted. It poses a paradox: a strict structure with an emotional exterior.

Luigi Dallapiccola: For Orchestra

Were one limited to a single term for Luigi Dallapiccola’s music, I would choose enchanted. It poses a paradox: a strict structure with an emotional exterior.

Huddersfield Festival 2004: Transpontine Reactions 2.

Installments two and three of the three-part retrospective of this past year’s Huddersfield Festival are made possible by BBC 3’s Hear and Now, which presented six concerts from this massive event.

Huddersfield Festival 2004: Transpontine Reactions 2.

Installments two and three of the three-part retrospective of this past year’s Huddersfield Festival are made possible by BBC 3’s Hear and Now, which presented six concerts from this massive event.

Huddersfield Festival 2004: Transpontine Reactions 1.

Festivals seem de rigueur these days — as omnipresent as Mozart on an American orchestra’s season schedule.

Huddersfield Festival 2004: Transpontine Reactions 1.

Festivals seem de rigueur these days — as omnipresent as Mozart on an American orchestra’s season schedule.

Thinking About Helmut Lachenmann, with Recommended Recordings

Helmut Lachenmann, the German composer born in Stuttgart in 1935, has been at the center of musical debates for nearly four decades and remains there, undaunted, today.

Thinking About Helmut Lachenmann, with Recommended Recordings

Helmut Lachenmann, the German composer born in Stuttgart in 1935, has been at the center of musical debates for nearly four decades and remains there, undaunted, today.