Beth Levin

At three Beth Levin fell in love with her first piano, an old Lester upright in the basement. She would go down for hours and create a little world for herself. Made her debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra at age 12, and performed with them again at 16. (Her teacher was the great Chopin interpreter, Maryan Filar.) On her first day as a pupil of Rudolf Serkin at the Curtis Institute, she roamed the halls of practice rooms wondering how anyone could practice for six hours. Her best moments have been as soloist with orchestras in Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Seattle, touring in Music From Marlboro and with chamber groups she has founded, most recently the American Arts Trio. She writes: “I live with my family in Brooklyn. I very much wanted children and was eager for the challenge of balancing a musical life with a home life. One of my favorite tasks is to pop a lasagna into the oven while doing some intense practicing, thereby fulfilling two roles at once — mother and musician.”

Early Rehearsal

Seven Poems

Early Rehearsal

Seven Poems

Late-Night Musings on a Late Sonata

Inside Beethoven’s sonata one manages a multifaceted, far-ranging and profound beauty of sound, emotion and idea.

Late-Night Musings on a Late Sonata

Inside Beethoven’s sonata one manages a multifaceted, far-ranging and profound beauty of sound, emotion and idea.

Ten Poems

Beth Levin has set two of her own poems, “Brooklyn” and “Sleeping Woman,” to music. They will be performed by mezzo Emily Howard at the Brooklyn Conservatory on September 12, 2004.

Ten Poems

Beth Levin has set two of her own poems, “Brooklyn” and “Sleeping Woman,” to music. They will be performed by mezzo Emily Howard at the Brooklyn Conservatory on September 12, 2004.

Notes of a Working Pianist

So, naturally, just as I’m a few chords short of entering Bellevue for observation, the telephone rings and a conductor speaks.

Notes of a Working Pianist

So, naturally, just as I’m a few chords short of entering Bellevue for observation, the telephone rings and a conductor speaks.

Balkan Snapshots

Beth recently spent three weeks in the former Yugoslavia performing and teaching piano under the sponsorship of the United States State Department…

Balkan Snapshots

Beth recently spent three weeks in the former Yugoslavia performing and teaching piano under the sponsorship of the United States State Department…

A Pianist’s Thoughts on Schumann: Symphonic Etudes, Op. 13

The opening chords seem to carry the weight of worldly sadness. A descending arpeggio in C-sharp minor supported by chords succeeds in resisting forward motion, giving the theme its somber beauty.

A Pianist’s Thoughts on Schumann: Symphonic Etudes, Op. 13

The opening chords seem to carry the weight of worldly sadness. A descending arpeggio in C-sharp minor supported by chords succeeds in resisting forward motion, giving the theme its somber beauty.

Mozart’s Rondo in A minor, K.V. 511

A melancholy dance of childlike hearts, delicate steps that shimmer even as they brood — to ask an eternal question, then listen as Mozart answers in cascades of pearls.

Mozart’s Rondo in A minor, K.V. 511

A melancholy dance of childlike hearts, delicate steps that shimmer even as they brood — to ask an eternal question, then listen as Mozart answers in cascades of pearls.

Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy and I

In December of 1808, Beethoven led an amateur group in the premiere of his Choral Fantasy for piano, chorus, and orchestra, Op. 80. They say he improvised the Introduction in performance and only later wrote it down.

Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy and I

In December of 1808, Beethoven led an amateur group in the premiere of his Choral Fantasy for piano, chorus, and orchestra, Op. 80. They say he improvised the Introduction in performance and only later wrote it down.

A Brief Look at Chopin’s Ballade in F minor, Op. 52

The Ballade comes in on a cloud, builds to a lightning storm keeping its center — the power of ppa melody spoken once, again, a third time, renewing truth with three tolls of a bell.

A Brief Look at Chopin’s Ballade in F minor, Op. 52

The Ballade comes in on a cloud, builds to a lightning storm keeping its center — the power of ppa melody spoken once, again, a third time, renewing truth with three tolls of a bell.

A View From the Green Room

“A mirror ringed in G.E. bulbs —
hopped up, I shimmy into
black velvet.”

A View From the Green Room

“A mirror ringed in G.E. bulbs —
hopped up, I shimmy into
black velvet.”